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  • Meramec Caverns, Stage Curtain at 3 minutes 38 seconds, 2011. Oil on linen on panel. 14 x 10 in.

    Very happy to have work in The GAIA Effect on Paddle 8 to benefit 350.org.

    #GAIAEffect #Paddle8 #kateharding #merameccaverns 

  • Participating in Anne Wilson's "To Cross(Walking New York)" at The Drawing Center. Opening Reception, Thursday September 18th 6-8pm

    I’m participating in a durational performance To Cross(Walking New York) by Anne Wilson at The Drawing Center as a part of the exhibition Thread Lines, curated by Joanna Kleinberg Romanow.  The opening is on this Thursday, September 18, 6 - 8 pm. Wilson’s piece will not be performed at the opening, however, you will be able to see the progress we’ve made so far in the pre-opening performances as we will by then have been walking thread of varying colors (specific however) for many days amongst the existing columns of the main gallery, making essentially a site specific “wall.” It’s absolutely wonderful to be a part of this work with Anne Wilson, and frankly it’s gorgeous.  The entire show is gorgeous actually and extremely thoughtfully curated.  We’ve been walking the piece in the pre-opening performances while they’ve been installing the show and it’s been very interesting.  
     
    As I said, no one is scheduled to be performing the piece during the opening night, but the thread wall will be present, of course, and my guess is that it will have been walked/woven to about my knee height…and it will be developing further until its over my head height, I believe (I’m 5'5’).  As a durational piece, this will develop over the next two months.
     
    The performance is ongoing and my public performance times, specifically are:
    Saturday, October 11th: 12:30 - 5:30pm
    Sunday, October 19th: 12:30 - 5:30pm
    Sunday, October 26th: 12:30 - 5:30pm
    It’d be great to see you there at the reception and/or any performance times you’d be up for seeing.  
    image
    Public Programs at The Drawing Center are FREE and open to the public.View this email in your browser

    OPENING RECEPTION

     

    Thursday, September 18, 6-8pm


    Please join us for the opening of Thread Lines and Xanti Schawinsky.


    SPECIAL PROGRAMS

     

    In conjunction with the exhibition Thread Lines, on view in the Main Gallery from September 19-December 14.

    Anne Wilson Performance
    To Cross (Walking New York)

    On view from September 19 – December 14, see performance times here.

    Don’t miss the site-specific performance To Cross (Walking New York), by Chicago-based artist Anne Wilson, that will use the main gallery’s four central columns as a weaving loom. The durational performance, which will take place over the course of two months, will result in the fabrication of a five by thirty-four foot sculpture. The exhibition admission ticket also includes this performance.

    Anne Wilson, Walking the Warp, Houston, TX, 2010, performance and sculpture



     



  • Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shots

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shots

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shots

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shots

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shots
Mule on Walnut series

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shots
Mule on Walnut series

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

Salton Sea installation

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt

    Kate Harding, “Both and All, But None Too Bright”

    exhibition installation shots

    July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

    photo credit: Ryan Handt

  • Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shot

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shot

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY


photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shot

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shot

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shot

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shot

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shot

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shot

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt Kate Harding, "Both and All, But None Too Bright"

exhibition installation shot

July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

photo credit: Ryan Handt "Omne ignotum pro magnifico: A conversation between Kate Harding and Dana Osburn," took place across the street at the laundromat, but was seen and heard from inside of Grace Space photo: Ryan Handt

    Kate Harding, “Both and All, But None Too Bright”

    solo exhibition installation shots

    July 2014, Grace Exhibition Space, Brooklyn, NY

    photo credit: Ryan Handt

  • Salton Sea installation at open studios. (at SVA Art Practice)

  • Preview of some work in"Kate Harding: Both and All, But None Too Bright" opening Saturday at Grace Exhibition Space in Brooklyn. From the “Mule on Walnut” pieces… Closing reception Monday 7-9. More info www.kate-harding.com #kateharding #bothandallbutnonetoobright #muleonwalnut #graceexhibitionspace #newyorkart #bushwickart (at Grace Exhibition Space)

  • Kate Harding - Both and All, But None Too Bright – July 19 through July 21, 2014

    Grace Exhibition Space, 840 Broadway, 2nd Floor, Brooklyn, NY 11206  

    www.grace-exhibition-space.com

    Open hours:
    - Weekend (7/19 -7/20) 10am-5pm
    - Weekday (7/21) 10am - 6pm

    Both and All, But None Too Bright, is an installation of Kate Harding’s work generated over the last two years, while living and working between New York City, rural Missouri and Los Angeles.

    A reception for the artist will be held on Monday, July 21st from 7-9pm.

    The title of the exhibition takes its name from a poem which uses language as a structure by which to engage the resonant harmonic of communication between entities within a landscape.

    The exhibition will be an installation throughout Grace Exhibition comprised of video, including documentation of “field experiments” and studies that have their roots in the wanderings in the woods of Harding’s upbringing.   These studies occur in rural Missouri, New York City, as well as the Salton Sea located in the Mojave Desert of California, and result in video work as well as sculptural drapery, drawing, paintings and photography.  In one instance, using her background in garment-making Harding devises systems of patternmaking that make solid drapery and fold of space and time.   

    As part of the installation, Harding will be in residence at Grace during open hours for a limited edition of consultation within a structure built specifically for such an exchange at this site. “Distraction/Discipline” consultations vary durationally and dimensionally.

    Also:                                                                                                  

    “Omne ignotum pro magnifico: Kate Harding in conversation with Dana Osburn,”                                                                                          

    A conversation will be had on Sunday, 7/20, 11am-12pm which will take place outside of Grace on the sidewalk.  The conversation can be viewed from the second floor at Grace looking out of the windows, while the sound of the conversation is heard through speakers installed inside the exhibition space.

    Only a few days prior to the July 23rd premier of Osburn’s film “A Study in Hot Sauce” at Tribeca Cinemas in New York, NY, Kate and Dana will discuss deduction, fan culture and perceptual reciprocity, and the perils of over-explanation. Outfits tbd.  For more information on Dana Osburn and Dollar Bowling Projects: http://www.dollarbowling.com

    For additional info: kateharding.la@gmail.com 

    Additional Artist Statement below.

    *          *          *

     “But Peter, how do we get to Neverland?”

    “Fly, of course.”

    “Fly?!”

    “It’s easy.  All you have to do is to…is to…is…to… HA, that’s          funny.”

    “What’s the matter?  Don’t you know?”

    “Oh sure. It’s just that I’ve never thought about it before.”

     

              -Excerpt from a conversation between Peter Pan and Wendy Darling

     

                When I was a small child and came across the movie Peter Pan for the first time, everything made sense.  I had forgotten how to fly.  Flying in “Peter Pan” served as a metaphor for those perceptions that left me beyond the edge of my verbal vocabulary and, for a large part, continue to elude my explanation. I felt that, now that I knew again, all should be unlocked.

                Walking through the woods and fields, there was a palpable sensation of having company, or an electric resonance that assured me there was something just out of my sight, so I went looking for “them” which I thought of as “my friends.”  My inclination was that if I could see things differentiated from the woods, it would articulate a source and explain things.  I assumed I walked amongst things (my friends) hiding from me, precisely because I had forgotten how to see them.  Peter Pan became my explanation and “flying” would be remembering.

    Because I couldn’t fly and couldn’t find “my friends” I was unable to “remember” and I put great effort into searching my mind for a memory of a memory that I would recognize. In that time, one of the devastations of my life defined itself as the inability to will myself into flight.

    *          *         *

    There are fairy tales and there is philosophy, theory, written and recorded history, thoughts and postulations, and also knowledge that is unspoken—things that go unsaid; things that are understood through pragmatics or gesture; things taken in from one’s surroundings as an extension of one’s self, perhaps as survival, or as familial engagement amongst kin of sorts. Then, there is the knowledge that is only said, recorded in repeated utterances over generations, across species and categories. Knowledge comes in many forms: articulated in words, or felt and intuited.

    The engagement with the perceptual and the reciprocal resonance amongst things in a landscape is central to my practice. My corporeal sensorial engagement is key. My subjective acting and sensing self [embodied perception] is my point of departure, but not to be privileged over other entities. Site and specificity locate my practice within direct corporeal experience. My interest is to show that this investment in the directly felt affect can engage ideas beyond the concrete, as well as what is held within them.

     

    Kate Harding, 2014

    Geronimi, Clyde(Dir), Disney, Walt(Prod), Jackson, Wilfred, and Luske, Hamilton, Bobby Driscoll and Kathryn Beaumont(Perf). Peter Pan. Walt Disney Studios/ RKO Pictures, 1953.

     

  • Included in The Grinstein Artist Invitational: From Generation to Generation

    I’m very happy to announce that I’ve been included in The Grinstein Artist Invitational: From Generation to Generation at Rosamund Felson Gallery in Los Angeles, CA to benefit Inner-City Arts. I’m honored to have been invited by Scott Grieger. Tickets are required for the preview reception May 28th, but all other days are open to the public.

    May 29 through June 1, 2014 / 11:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    FIRST LOOK PREVIEW & ARTIST RECEPTION
    Wednesday, May 28 / 5:30 PM to 8:30 PM
    Tickets: $100 donation per person (includes drinks and small bites)

    To purchase tickets, visit: 
    http://www.inner-cityarts.org/how-you-can-help-benefit-art-show.php

    Or call (213) 627-9621

    To be held at the Rosamund Felsen Gallery
    Bergamot Station, 2525 Michigan Avenue, B4 
    Santa Monica, CA 90404

    image

    Meramec Caverns Construction #1
    29 x 22 inches
    Oil, straight pins and gesso on linen on panel

    imageMeramec Caverns Construction #1, detail

    https://www.facebook.com/events/841906032491742/

    Join us for a special group exhibition in recognition of Elyse and Stanley Grinstein featuring work by many of the artists they befriended and supported over the years. Each artist was asked to invite another artist to join them whose work they felt deserved greater attention. From the generation of artists supported by the Grinsteins, to the artists invited to join them for this exhibition, to the thousands of Los Angeles youth who are served by Inner-City Arts each year, the Grinstein Artist Invitational is a celebration of Elyse and Stanley’s legacy of generosity.

    Participating Artists:
    Lita Albuquerque, Peter Alexander, Bale Creek Allen, Terry Allen, Justin Davis Anderson, Carmen Argote, Chuck Arnoldi, Natalie Arnoldi, Larry Bell, Billy Al Bengston, Kelly Berg, Tony Berlant, Marc Breslin, Chris Burden, Casper Brindle, Javier Carrillo, Bruce Cohen, Corinne Chaix, Woods Davy, Ariel Dill, Guy Dill, Laddie John Dill, Alec Egan, Ned Evans, Joe Fay, Jim Ganzer, Joe Goode, Scott Grieger, Charles Christopher Hill, Kate Harding, Kenyatta A.C. Hinkle, Bettina Hubby, Steve Hurd, Noa P. Kaplan, Jake Kean-Mayman, Jeremy Kidd, Nicholette Kominos, Nina Laurinolli, David Lloyd, Kim McCarty, Dan McCleary, Andy Moses, Ed Moses, Gwynn Murrill, Helen Pashgian, Astrid Preston, Bruce Richards, Ed Ruscha, Gretchen Ryan, Alison Saar, Randye Sandel, Adrian Saxe, Peter Shelton, Alexis Smith, Jennifer Steinkamp, Don Suggs, Dewain Valentine, Greta Waller, Alex Weinstein, Brian Wills, Laurie Katz Yehia

    Benefit Exhibition Committee:
    Chuck Arnoldi, Linda Blank, Bobbie Greenfield, Ellen Grinstein Perliter, Jimmy Isensen, Tyler Lemkin, Carl Schlosberg, and William Turner.

  • One more day for “The Hot 100” to benefit the Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation.

    https://paddle8.com/work/kate-harding/27487-meramec-caverns-stage-curtain-at-4-minutes-26-seconds

    Curated by Sarah Belden Fine Art Advisory THE HOT 100 features 100 top, international, emerging artists with artworks priced under $10,000. Proceeds from THE HOT 100 auction will go to environmental and humanitarian charities supported by the Leonardo Dicaprio Foundation, aimed at raising awareness for climate change and environmental issues and fostering a harmonious relationship between humanity and the natural world.

    The Meramec Caverns paintings are inspired by stills from a video I made of a light show that takes place during a tour of Meramec Caverns in Stanton, Missouri. As the finale of a guided tour throughout the circuitous chambers of the cavern, the light show is a spectacularly vibrant projection of colored light flashes onto the cave’s largest formation, known as “The Stage Curtain.” Composed by the tour guides themselves, these light shows are accompanied by a very site specific musical soundtrack, to which varying tour guides perform their own energetic response by flipping a myriad of manual switches on what is essentially a fuze box. I seek to capture some of the energy and physicality of those fleeting moments and have been working through ideas from this site in a series of oil paintings. I came to art through painting, but hadn’t used paint as a material for years until the Meramec Caverns project came about. The way the caverns were formed through sediment eroded by underground water systems or formation built up by sediment carried in water, made perfect sense to me in terms of paint. The pigment suspended in fluid relates to the caves’ additive and reductive evolution.